Innovation
Article

Vibrating Atoms Make Robust Qubits, Physicists Find

by
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Photo by <a href="https://unsplash.com/@theshubhamdhage?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText">Shubham Dhage</a> on <a href="https://unsplash.com/s/photos/atom?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText">Unsplash</a>
Get Unlimited Access

You are puchasing a Digital Access Subscription. You will be automatically charged $9.99 every 28 days for one year. Your subscription will continue until you cancel. By subscribing, you are accepting the Automation Alley Terms of Service, Privacy Policy, and Terms of Sale.

SubscribeBecome a Member

Photo by <a href="https://unsplash.com/@theshubhamdhage?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText">Shubham Dhage</a> on <a href="https://unsplash.com/s/photos/atom?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText">Unsplash</a>

Summary

MIT researchers have found a way to store quantum information in the vibrational motion of atom pairs, similar to the swinging motion of two pendula, connected by a spring. The quantum register contains hundreds of pairs of vibrating qubits that researchers can coherently control for over ten seconds. If this works out, it will have a huge impact on quantum computing!

Vibrating Atoms Make Robust Qubits, Physicists Find

MIT physicists have discovered a new quantum bit, or “qubit,” in the form of vibrating pairs of atoms known as fermions. They found that when pairs of fermions are chilled and trapped in an optical lattice, the particles can exist simultaneously in two states — a weird quantum phenomenon known as superposition. In this case, the atoms held a superposition of two vibrational states, in which the pair wobbled against each other while also swinging in sync, at the same time.

The team was able to maintain this state of superposition among hundreds of vibrating pairs of fermions. In so doing, they achieved a new “quantum register,” or system of qubits, that appears to be robust over relatively long periods of time. The discovery, published today in the journal Nature, demonstrates that such wobbly qubits could be a promising foundation for future quantum computers.

Read more here:

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Related
Become a Member