Virtual and Augmented Reality
Article

Future of work: Smart glasses, holograms and AI-equipped robots will change our jobs

by
The Washington Post
April 18, 2022
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Summary

This interview between the Washington Post and Cristiano Amon, president and CEO of wireless chip firm Qualcomm, highlights some of the ways AR and VR technology will change the future of work. 

Future of work: Smart glasses, holograms and AI-equipped robots will change our jobs

The future of how we work will, in a few years, include smart glasses that transport workers into augmented or virtual reality environments, communicating with your co-workers via a hologram from anywhere in the world or relying on robots powered by artificial intelligence to help run manufacturing operations.

That’s the direction technology is headed, says Cristiano Amon, president and CEO of wireless chip firm Qualcomm. Amon, who started at Qualcomm 27 years ago as an engineer, rose through the ranks to take the top job at the San Diego-based company on June 30. Since becoming CEO, he has been working to diversify Qualcomm’s businessfrom focusing primarily on chips for mobile phones to those used in self-driving cars, A.I.-enabled manufacturing machines and more powerful and battery-efficient laptops. He says Qualcomm’s biggest challenge now is the semiconductor industry not having enough supply to meet demand and hiring talented workers.

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The Washington Post
The Washington Post

The mission of The Washington Post is defined in a set of principles written by Eugene Meyer, who bought the newspaper in 1933. Today, they are displayed in brass linotype letters in an entrance to the newsroom. (His gender references have been supplanted by our policy of inclusion, but the values remain.)

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